Ink

Artists:

Wanda Gag

Trina Schart Hyman

Lois Lenski

James Marshall

Maurice Sendak

A crop of Wanda Gag's artwork from Millions of Cats. Click through to enlarge

Ink is dyed or pigmented liquid.

India ink is the most commonly used ink in illustration because the flat dark color allows for easy printing, scanning, or photocopying. India ink ingredients are carbon black, sometimes called lamp black (this can be acquired from a variety of sources but often is the soot produced by burning petroleum-based products), and shellac, which is a resin that allows the ink to dry quickly, flatly and permanently. Another common ink, sepia, is dark brown and historically created from squid ink, but it is now often made synthetically. There are also modern inventions like acrylic inks, which use acrylic polymers as pigment.


Millions of Cats by Wanda Gág cover, a man is walking over a hill surrounded by cats

Cover. Click through to enlarge

Millions of Cats by Wanda Gág interior page, a man is walking over a hill surrounded by cats

Final art. Click through to enlarge

Wanda Gag illustration (click again)

Final art. Click through to enlarge

Wanda Gag crop (click again)

Crop. Click through to enlarge

Wanda Gag: Millions of Cats

Gag used ink to draw outlines of cats and characters, as well as for shading and creating tonal qualities.

“I aim to make the illustrations for children’s books as much a work of art as anything I would send to an art exhibition.  I strive to make them completely accurate in relation to the text.  I try to make them warmly human, imaginative, or humourous - not coldly decorative - and to make them so clear that a three-year-old can recognize the main object in them.”

Gale Research Company. Yesterday’s Authors of Books for Children: Facts and Pictures about Authors and Illustrators of Books for Young People, from Early Times to 1960, Vol 1. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 1977.


Trina Schart Hyman cover (click again)

Cover. Click through to enlarge

Trina Schart Hyman (click again)

Final art. Click to enlarge

Trina Schart Hyman: Caddie Woodlawn

Trina Schart Hyman worked on illustration board, between Fabriano, Bainbridge, or Whatman. She then drew lightly with pencil before inking over her pencil drawings with a Winsor and Newton Series 7 sable brush #1. She preferred brush over pen for its sensitivity. After linework, she would sometimes add acrylic paint in light transparent washes. Working in pen and ink, Hyman displayed her skill in light and shading, as well as fine detail.

http://www.metrocast.net/~tortak/illustrators/Hyman3.html



James Marshall (click again)

Cover. Click through to enlarge

James Marshall (2) (click again)

Process. Click through to enlarge

James Marshall (3) (click again)

Process. Click through to enlarge

James Marshall: The Cut-Ups at Camp Custer

Marshall used ink for the outlining of his characters, utilizing the ink to give a sharp, bold edge with an underlay of watercolor.


Maurice Sendak cover (click again)

Cover. Click through to enlarge

Maurice Sendak illustration (click again)

Final art. Click through to enlarge

Maurice Sendak: A Hole is to Dig

Sendak used pen and ink to create children and their dog rolling in the snow. Employing short lines, simple outlining, cross hatching, and shading, he expressed much through simplicity.

When creating illustrations, Sendak first created many sketches on tracing paper, working until satisfied with the environments and character design. Then he made a dummy book, with each illustration being a study for the final art. This allowed him to imagine how the final book would look and make necessary changes. He then moved onto his final illustrations, creating them using crowquill nibs and india ink and, if he desired to produce the book in color, he would add light watercolor washes.

"Maurice Sendak (1928-)." Something About the Author, edited by Lisa Kumar, vol. 165, Gale, 2006, pp. 192-200. Something About the Author, login.ezproxy.lib.umn.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=SATA&sw=w&u=umn_wilson&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CBLNUHU059376249&it=r. Accessed 12 Dec. 2016.

Gale Document Number:GALE|BLNUHU059376249

Drawing
Ink